High Fructose Corn Syrup!

Be aware that high fructose corn syrup will be renamed to “corn sugar”.

The new name “corn sugar” was submitted to the federal government for permission to be used in food labels by the Corn Refiners Association. They have leverage with the government and it is most likely to be approved so look forward to the new label. Don’t be  mistaken by thinking it’s different. It’s the same and is very bad for you.

What is exactly high fructose corn syrup (HFCS)?

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a man-made sweetener that is found in a wide range of processed foods, from ketchup and cereals to crackers and salad dressings. It also sweetens just about all of the (regular) soda Americans drink. HFCS used in foods is between 50 to 55 percent fructose—so chemically, it’s virtually identical to table sugar (sucrose), which is 50 percent fructose. Metabolic studies suggest our bodies break down and use HFCS and sucrose the same way.

Why is it bad for you?

Research has shown that “high-fructose corn syrup” goes directly to the liver, releasing enzymes that instruct the body to then store fat! This may elevate triglyceride (fat in blood) levels and elevate cholesterol levels. This fake fructose may slow fat burning and cause weight gain. Other research indicates that it does not stimulate insulin production, which usually creates a sense of being full. Therefore, people may eat more than they should. Indications also are that the important chromium levels are lowered by this sweetener which may then contribute to type 2 diabetes. Obesity is a contributor too.

HFCS is easy to transport in tanker trucks. It isn’t susceptible to freezer burn, as is sugar. It has a long shelf life and keeps foods from becoming dry. It gives bread and baked products a wonderful color. It’s also cheaper than white sugar, partly because of generous federal subsidies and trade policies that encourage farmers to grow more corn. Fast food chains add it to their products because it is cheaper. It’s in the sauces, in the condiments, in the breadings, in the buns and in the drinks. It is the commercially preferred artificial sweetener by most food manufacturers.

Re-posted by Eddie Lester

Original Author: Alicia Fong